About Ink

Ink by Sabrina Vourvoulias

What happens when rhetoric about immigrants escalates to an institutionalized population control system? The near-future, dark speculative novel INK opens as a biometric tattoo is approved for use to mark temporary workers, permanent residents and citizens with recent immigration history – collectively known as inks.

Set in a fictional city and small, rural town in the U.S. during a 10-year span, the novel is told in four voices: a journalist; an ink who works in a local population control office; an artist strongly tied to a specific piece of land; and a teenager whose mother runs an inkatorium (a sanitarium-internment center opened in response to public health concerns about inks).

The main characters grapple with ever-changing definitions of power, home and community; relationships that expand and complicate their lives; personal magicks they don’t fully understand; and perceptions of “otherness” based on ethnicity, language, class and inclusion. In this world, the protagonists’ magicks serve and fail, as do all other systems – government, gang, religious organization – until only two things alone stand: love and memory.


“This story is as immortal as the souls of the nahuales of our ancestors’ lore, and perhaps just as powerful.”
- Elianne Ramos, vice-chair of Latinos in Social Media (LATISM)

More reviews of Ink


Published by Crossed Genres Publications on Monday, October 15, 2012.
Edited by Bart R. Leib

Press release (English) | Press release (Spanish)

For review copies please contact publicity @ crossedgenres . com.